See the live dashboard for CensusAtSchool 2021
News › 2011

Teachers’ Day 2011

The following files from the 2011 Statistics Teachers’ Day organised by the Auckland mathematical Association and The University of Auckland’s Department of Statistics have now been put up on Census At School’s website:

http://www.censusatschool.org.nz/2011/statistics-teachers-day-years-12-and-13/

Continue reading »

iNZight updates

Use of the iNZight program for analysing statistical data analysis has just been made a whole lot easier. The software is now packaged in a form where it can be downloaded (or copied) and then used on Windows machines without the user needing to have administrative privileges because it needs no formal installation – see the downloads page at:

http://www.stat.auckland.ac.nz/~wild/iNZight/

Continue reading »

Rugby World Cup: Victus

CensusAtSchool’s survey results have made their way to Indonesia!

“Interestingly, an online educational survey in New Zealand, “CensusAtSchool”, reflected the fact that 83 percent of young respondents expected the All Blacks to make the final of the competition, while only 41 percent thought that they would actually go on to win it.

This contrasts with a UMR Research Ltd. poll that found 77 percent of New Zealand’s adults (parents, presumably, of at least some of the aforementioned children) predicting an All Blacks success story.

The results are surprising. One would have thought that the kids would have been all wide-eyed and dreamy, full of youthful hope and exuberance, while the adults tempered their optimism with the experience of regular disappointment.

Apparently, this is not so, reflecting perhaps the extent to which the “chokers” tag is resonant among the younger generation.”

Source: The Jakarta Post

CensusAtSchool NZ Update

CensusAtSchool New Zealand has just been run in May/June 2011. This is the fifth time CensusAtSchool has been held in New Zealand, and it is also run in Australia, Canada, Ireland, Japan, South Africa, UK and USA.

Over 25,000 Year 5-13 students from around the country have taken part to date by completing 31 questions. This is the second biggest participation the project has had to date. More than 1,600 teachers have registered their classes.

There has been significant media coverage of this year’s census – including a story on 3 News, front page story on the NZ Herald which went around the world, radio interviews on Newstalk ZB, Radio Live and Radio New Zealand National.

CensusAtSchool data will be made available to teachers and students via its website shortly and has been referenced in many New Zealand textbooks.

Listen online »

Source: Morning Report, Radio NZ

Source: NZ Herald

Les Écoliers pessimistes

“In a survey conducted by research firm CensusAtSchool, 59% of 24,000 students surveyed see New Zealand All Blacks lose the next World Cup.

CensusAtSchool research firm found that 59% of New Zealand children who responded to a survey on the next World Cup saw the All Blacks lose in the final. 81% of young people aged 8-17 years, are nevertheless partners Richie McCaw to qualify for the final. These surprising results contrast with the optimism of their parents. They are confident and think that 77% of New Zealand will lift the Webb Ellis trophy for the first time since 1987.”

Source: Rugby 365

Thousands of New Zealand children believe the All Blacks will make the Rugby World Cup final – but more than half expect them to blow it once again when they get there.

An online educational survey, CensusAtSchool, predicted the All Blacks will be waiting yet another four years to get their hands on what has been their most elusive prize.

Eighty-three per cent of the young respondents expected the All Blacks to make the final on October 23, but only 41 per cent thought they would win it.

This is in contrast to their parents, who are optimistic the All Blacks will secure the Webb Ellis Cup for the first time since 1987.

A Herald/DigiPoll survey in January found that 70 per cent of adults thought the All Blacks would triumph.

A UMR poll in April found even more confidence, with 77 per cent of adults sure of a NZ victory.

CensusAtSchool co-director Rachel Cunliffe, a University of Auckland-trained statistician, said the children’s results were “a bit of a surprise”.

“We had expected that as children and young people are often such ardent rugby fans, they would be talking the All Blacks right up.”

Ms Cunliffe said the students’ verdict was also remarkably consistent across geographical areas, age and sex.

Of the 83 per cent who thought the All Blacks would make the final, 35 per cent picked South Africa to be their opponents, ahead of the 30 per cent who chose Australia.

Of those predicting an All Black win in the final, 25 per cent picked a margin of fewer than five points.

Former All Black great Stu Wilson said the results were a surprise and also a bit disappointing.

“I saw over 100 kids of all ages running around in the mud on the North Shore on Saturday night and if you asked any one of them who will win the World Cup they would all say the All Blacks – that’s a rugby environment,” said Wilson.

“It’s still in our DNA. I don’t care what the league and netball or cricket people say, rugby is still our our number one sport … It [the survey] surprises me and disappoints me, to be completely honest.”

Wilson said the All Blacks had dominated the world rankings for the past decade, something the children surveyed might have missed.

“If their memory goes that far back and it reflects on their decision about whether the All Blacks can win or not, that’s sad – they don’t understand the world rankings and how good we are.”

Veteran rugby commentator Keith Quinn said the results were intriguing and showed children’s awareness of NZ’s rugby history and the tag the All Blacks had possibly earned as chokers.

“They know their subject obviously and are aware that winning the Rugby World Cup is not ever a foregone conclusion,” he said.

“I feel that the adult populace of New Zealand back in 1987 believed that the win over France in the first RWC was just affirmation of what we had felt for decades about how great New Zealand rugby consistently was … and that we would go on to probably win it every four years.”

Quinn thought South Africa should be favoured if they reach the final.

“The World Cup final has always been a grim, tough game, won by serious ‘let’s not lose’ rugby,” he said.

“South Africa with its big pack and tactically aware halfback and first-five are best at that sort of game, with excellent goalkicking and dropkicking experts too. They have won their only two finals by not scoring a try.”

“Maybe the kids know that too?”

The survey ran in schools from Kaitaia to Invercargill in May and June and involved 24,000 students aged 8 to 17.

Source: Star Canterbury

A sobering prediction for this year’s Rugby World Cup has the All Blacks making the final but losing at the last hurdle.

And that’s come from a group of armchair experts not normally known for their pessimism.

A survey has found that 24,000 schoolchildren predict an All Blacks v South Africa final – but believe the South Africans will lift the Webb Ellis trophy at the final whistle.

The CensusAtSchool survey, which ran from May 2 – June 10 in schools from Kaitaia to Invercargill, involved students aged 8 to 17.

Of the 83% of the students who predicted the All Blacks would make the final on October 23, just 41% thought they would win.

CensusAtSchool co-director Rachel Cunliffe, a University of Auckland-trained statistician, said the students’ results were a bit of a surprise.

“We had expected that as children and young people are often such ardent rugby fans, they’d be talking the All Blacks right up,” she said.

The students’ verdict was also remarkably consistent across geographical areas, age and sex, said Cunliffe.

Of those who think the All Blacks will make the final, 35% are picking South Africa to be the opponent and 30% Australia.

Of the 41% predicting an All Blacks win, 25% thought there would be a winning margin of under five points.

This is the fifth time New Zealand has held CensusAtSchool, which is also run in Australia, Canada, Ireland, Japan, South Africa, the United Kingdom and the United States.

Source: TVNZ