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Maths Week 2020 is being held between 10 August and Friday 14 August.

Maths Week provides resources for students and teachers.  The material Maths Week is written for all students from Year 1 through to Year 11 at different levels:

  • Level 1 – primarily for Years 1 and 2.
  • Level 2 – primarily for Years 3 and 4.
  • Level 3 – primarily for Years 5 and 6.
  • Level 4 – primarily for Years 7 and 8.
  • Level 5 – primarily for Years 9, 10 and 11.

One of the Maths Week series (Maths Millionaire) has also been translated into te reo Māori.

Teachers who register for Maths Week have access to answers to questions and other notes.

Maths Week resources are available free, on-line, to teachers, parents and students.

For teachers to register themselves and their class numbers, go to www.mathsweek.co.nz/

Maths Week 2020

Maths Week 2020 will be on from Monday 10 August until Friday 14 August.

Last year there were 288 441 students and 6657 teachers registered throughout New Zealand.  This is an increase of 5594 students and 543 teachers from 2018.

Maths Week is written for all students from Year 1 through to Year 11.

It is available free, on-line, to teachers, parents and students.

Maths Week material is written:

  • to encourage students’ interest in mathematics and statistics
  • to give teachers resources that they can use in the classroom, particularly material that requires some research and which may not be readily available to them, or that can be used electronically in class
  • to show the pleasure that mathematics can provide and some of the everyday places where it can be used
  • to give teachers material that can provide extension.

Maths Week has five levels:

  • Level 1 – primarily for Years 1 and 2.
  • Level 2 – primarily for Years 3 and 4.
  • Level 3 – primarily for Years 5 and 6.
  • Level 4 – primarily for Years 7 and 8.
  • Level 5 – primarily for Years 9, 10 and 11.

This year, the Maths Week sections are similar to those of 2019.

  • Survivor series. A series of in-class tasks at levels 1 – 5 for each day during Maths Week.  Each day’s tasks has a theme (the same theme for all levels).
  • Maths Millionaire. Maths questions, with junior (Years 5 and 6), middle (Years 7 and 8), senior (Years 9 – 11) and family divisions.
  • The Maths Chaser. Maths questions at each of levels 2 – 5.
  • Daily Dollar. Maths activities at each of levels 1 – 5.
  • Dollars and cents. Questions to encourage financial capability (primarily for Years 9 – 11) for each day during Maths Week.  Each day’s questions has a theme.
  • Super Challenge. One mathematical challenge each day for four days.  Those who answer all four correctly can get a certificate.
  • Some Maths Matters. Five chapters on various mathematical topics.
  • Two interactive games.

Maths Millionaire and the games are easily accessed by students on their tablets or phones.

Teachers who register for Maths Week have access to answers to questions and other notes.

For teachers to register themselves and their class numbers, go to https://www.mathsweek.co.nz/

Are your students ready for an on-line statistical modeling challenge for maths week!? Expose your students to future careers that will be found at the intersection of data, visual arts and modelling.

Anna Martin has created a word difficulty ranking generator, students can gather data to try and model and predict a ‘readability score’. Statistics teachers if you would like to find out more background about the challenge visit Anna’s website.

How will the challenge run?

Monday to Tuesday

Students test their own words through the on-line text analyser, record data from these tests, and try to develop a way to predict the readability score. They should make some notes/diagrams for their model and use these to predict readability scores for the first set of reserved words.

Wednesday to Thursday

Students have access to check the first set of reserved words. They enter the readability score they would predict for each reserved word, and see how this compares to the actual readability score. This should help them refine their prediction model.

Friday

Students have access to check the second set of reserved words. They enter the readability score they would predict for each reserved word, and see how this compares to the actual readability score. They should only do this once (i.e. this should be their final evaluation of the model).

Keen to give it a go?

Here’s the place to send students: http://mathstatic.co.nz/predictive-text-challenge